Check out airpark self-certification plan before Homeland Security mandates something

Homeland Security has been much more aggressive in the last year in its attempts to control more and more aspects of general aviation. First there was the proposed rulings pertaining to aircraft over 12,500 pounds. Next the agency has been coming up with new requirements for pilots and airplane owners at airports with airline operations […]

Homeland Security has been much more aggressive in the last year in its attempts to control more and more aspects of general aviation.

First there was the proposed rulings pertaining to aircraft over 12,500 pounds. Next the agency has been coming up with new requirements for pilots and airplane owners at airports with airline operations and finally the onerous agency actions related to those wanting to fly their own aircraft to and from Canada.

General Aviation News, AOPA and EAA recently have all published information about these issues and they all deserve prompt attention from pilots.

With all these attempts to “keep the country safe” by placing more and more restrictions on general aviation I fear it won’t be too much longer before the agency comes after residential airparks with attempts to limit actions and make flying more inconvenient.Some time ago I came up with a residential airpark self-certification plan and posted it here on Living With Your Plane.

This self-certification plan is designed to make your flyin community a safer place against all kinds of intruders, primarily burglars or vandals. I don’t honestly believe terrorists are about to invade a residential airpark to steal a plane and commit it to illicit acts of violence. But, the self-certification could keep the Homeland Security and other federal agencies off the back of airpark residents by showing we’ve already gotten everything done that is needed to keep the runways and airplanes safe.

In addition, the self-certification plan can be used to show local political entities, law enforcement agencies and others that flyin communities are responsible, law-abiding and security conscious.

Take a look at our security plan and see how you can utilize all or parts of it to improve your facility and hopefully ward off those who really don’t have a clue about general aviation but keep trying to affect us anyway.

5 comments

  1. Jens

    I agree that taking a pro-active stance on this issue will result in the best situation for everyone.

    In addition to accomplishing a “self-certification”, I wonder if there would be a benefit to creating an organization or association of private airport owners/operators. Something like AAAE for the private side of airports. It could serve as an avenue for communication between its members as well as a “community voice” when dealing with government policies, whether that is future TSA regulations or current issues with local municipalities.

  2. I am sure there could be a benefit to an organization or association of private airport operators – owners. I know there is (or has been) an association of Florida private airparks.

    It seems to me this is an area for an organization like AOPA or AAAE to step up and fill the void. Even in today’s internet-connected world, setting up such an organization and managing it requires considerable time and effort and manpower (which relates to money).

    Anyone want to step forward and get this done?

  3. Andre Durocher

    Hi Dave,

    When I click on (http://livingwithyourplane.com/airparks/wp-admin/post.php?action=edit&post=64the) for the residential airpark self-certification plan I am redirected to the Idoha post.

    I would like to find this self-certification plan.
    Thank you.
    André.

  4. Hello Andre,

    Thank you for the note. We’ve corrected the link in the story. You can also get to the story here.

  5. Jens

    I see that some individuals in Virginia have come together to create an Airport Owner’s organization. I hope they are successful and that their actions encourage the same thing in other parts of the nation.

    http://www.generalaviationnews.com/?p=6438

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.