Info on Airparks in Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut & Delaware

Editor’s note: Another in our planned series of stories describing state by state the airparks listed in the Living With Your Plane Directory. We started with Alaska and will tackle one state per issue unless there are a particularly low number of airparks in that particular state. In that case, we’ll try to do several […]

Editor’s note: Another in our planned series of stories describing state by state the airparks listed in the Living With Your Plane Directory. We started with Alaska and will tackle one state per issue unless there are a particularly low number of airparks in that particular state. In that case, we’ll try to do several states in the same story.

As always, we welcome your comments and ideas and of course, if your residential airpark isn’t listed or if you have information about other fly-in communities in the state for which we’re reporting, click here to and fill in as much information as you have.

We’ll look at residential airparks in the states of Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut and Delaware in this issue and next time we’ll explore the fly-in communities located in California.

The first of the seven airparks in Arkansas opened in 1962, according to the Living With Your Plane database. It was Valley Airpark at Cotter. Five of the listed developments have lots of an acre or more and the largest project has a total of 72 lots. A couple others have 40 or 45 lots and the others are 30 lots or less.

Runway length at the fly-in communities varies from 4,m800 feet at the longest to 2,600 feet at the short end. Only two of the seven airparks report paved runways while the others come in as unpaved.

Colorado has a dozen airparks and the oldest – Meadow Lake at Peyton – came on line in 1963 with 35 lots. The runner-up for the oldest airpark in Colorado is Can Aire Skypark at Brighton, a Denver suburb. It opened in 1968 and has a total of 86 lots.

All the residential properties on the airparks in the state are over one acre and the largest fly-in community, when you consider number of lots only, is Erie with 125 lots.

As you might expect, runway lengths in Colorado stretch out to 7,000 feet at the top with most in the 4,500 to 6,000-foot length. The shortest is a 2,800-foot strip in Parker, Colo. Where the airport elevation is 6200 feet.

Interestingly enough, eight of the runways are paved and four of them report grass.

Connecticut has only one reported fly-in community and Delaware has a couple.

The Salmon River Airpark in Colchester, CT was opened in 1959. The four lots are all over an acre; the unpaved runway is 2200 feet long.

Delaware’s Chandelle Estates in Dover became operational in 1962. Both the fly-in communities listed in the state claims lots of more than an acre. One airpark boats 27 lots while the other has 10. The runways, one paved and one unpaved, are 2,560 and 3,500 feet.

Arkansas:

  • Fullmer Field Estates, Lonoke
  • Holley Mountain Airpark, Clinton
  • Tannenbaum Airpark, Drasco
  • Winfield Airstrip Community, Altus
  • Red Oak Airpark, Cabot
  • Country Air Estates, Lonoke
  • The Valley Airport, Cotter

Colorado:

  • Avion Club @ Buckhorn ranch, Crested Butte
  • Crawford Airpark, Crawford
  • Golden Field, Gardner
  • Greenbaum Valley Airport, Pueblo
  • Happy Canyon Aero Ranch, Montrose
  • Parkland Estates Airport, Erie
  • Silver-West estates, Colorado Springs
  • Van Aire Skypark, Brighton
  • Kelly Airpark, Elbert
  • Rocky Mountain Airpark, Parker
  • Meadow Lake Airport, Peyton
  • Erie Air Park, Erie

Connecticut:

  • Salmon River Airfield, Colchester

Delaware:

  • Chandelle Estates, Dover
  • Eagle Crest Aerodrome, Milton

1 comment

  1. These are not surprising my anymore, but thanks..

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